Monthly Archives: January 2017

comealive

Five Things to Make Your Characters Come ALIVE!

The other day, Jon saw an okay article about character building, which listed such things as:

1 Where does your character live?
2 Where is your character from?
3 How old is your character?
4 What is your character called?
etc.

These are fine to start. But what can add that extra spark?

Jon’s list is:

1. What are the intensifiers your character uses? And please know why. (Example: The guy at the hardware store says Super Duper. Not ironically.)

2. What is your character’s secret? (Example: Has a brother in a mental institution. Who the character took a lot of money from.)

3. What is your character’s three main t emotions? (Example: Fear. Panic. Exhaustion.)

4. What are two of their quirks? (Example: They have a whole deal for eating French Fries.)

5. What is your character’s sense of humor? Do they do puns? What about making fun of others? Something more than the usual scarcasm in so many novels.

slumgullion

Jonathan Green’s Dictionary of Slang

Juliet and Jon play a word game based on the fantastic internet writing resource that is Jonathan Green’s Dictionary of Slang.

Green’s Dictionary of Slang is the largest historical dictionary of English slang. Written by Jonathon Green over 17 years from 1993, it reached the printed page in 2010 in a three-volume set containing nearly 100,000 entries supported by over 400,000 citations from c. ad 1000 to the present day. The main focus of the dictionary is the coverage of over 500 years of slang from c. 1500 onwards.
The printed version of the dictionary received the Dartmouth Medal for outstanding works of reference from the American Library Association in 2012; fellow recipients include the Dictionary of American Regional English, the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. It has been hailed by the American New York Times as ‘the pièce de résistance of English slang studies’ and by the British Sunday Times as ‘a stupendous achievement, in range, meticulous scholarship, and not least entertainment value’.

https://greensdictofslang.com/

Juliet mentions timeline of relationship words: